Style Taxonomy types and inner/outer line – connected?

When you have a style analysis with me, some of the things you will learn about are your inner and outer line, as well as your type in the Style Taxonomy system. Your inner line is based on your face shape; whether you have a more angular face or a more curved/contoured. Your outer line refers to the general line of your body, your silhouette; linear, curvilinear or curvy. Technically speaking, any style type can have any inner and outer line. That said, as your style type is also based on your features, your body and your energy/vibe, there are some some traits that are more common amongst certain types. The suggested looks and garments for each type act as a match maker between the person and their outfits; mirroring their physical attributes and vibe. The Style Memoirs and the Style Taxonomy system wishes to bring forth you and make your outfits mirror that, not try to make you look like someone or something else.

Below I have shortly summarised other traits/features that people who share the same type typically have. Variations do of course exist, so the connections below are generalisations rather than universal truths.

 

A _______________________________ will typically have:

Dramatic: Linear outer line, angled inner line. Usually tall with sharp, narrow and exotic/feline features.

Natural: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled inner line. Usually athletic/strong build with relatively broad shoulders. Facial features are typically blunt and/or wide. A square jaw and/or strong chin is common.

Classic: Curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually average height. Usually a balanced, evenly proportionate body and face. Not very large, full or sharp facial features.

Gamine: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Short to average height (will not be tall). Compact and/or narrow body, small hands and feet. Often rounded eyes, a relatively small mouth and an upturned nose.

Delicate: Any outer line, contoured inner line. Can be any height as long as the bone structure is delicate and the facial features delicate. Usually big and/or rounded eyes and a rosebud mouth. Never large and strong features or a big bone structure.

Romantic: Curvilinear or curvy outer line, contoured inner line. Usually short or average height. Full and rounded features, never sharp. Typically hourglass or bottom-heavy.

Amazon: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled inner line. Usually tall with large and/or wide features, or narrow with blunt features and prominent bone structure.  Typically wide shoulders. Will not appear dainty/delicate.

Urbane: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled inner line. Usually a balanced body, with prominent facial bones and relatively balanced features or a mainly balanced face with one or two larger, more exotic features.

Experimental: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually short to average height. Compact and/or narrow body, a mix of large and small facial features. Typically prominent facial bones.

Minx: Curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Typically sharp and small, dainty bone structure. Facial bones are often prominent with large or/rounded eyes and some sharpness (often in the nose or chin).

Serpentine: Curvilinear or curvy outer line, angled inner line. Usually average to tall. Full, facial features with a slightly feline/exotic look and a prominent bone structure that can be wide and/or sharp.

Minimalist: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually a balanced body or athletic figure, facial features balanced and slightly blunt.

Pixie: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Short to average height. Usually an athletic and/or compact body, features a mix of blunt and narrow, wide and small.

Ingenue: Curvilinear outer line, contoured inner line. Usually short to average height. Some blunt features, typically large eyes and full cheeks that give off a youthful vibe.

Wildflower: Curvilinear or curvy outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually short to average height. Blunt, wide and some full features with a relatively wide bone structure. Not sharp or very prominent features.

Dapper: Linear or curvilinear outer line, contoured inner line. Short to average height (not tall). Mainly balanced body and facial features, typically a small nose or mouth and small hands and feet.

Finespun: Curvilinear outer line, contoured inner line. Usually average height. Typically a balanced body with a small bone structure and some dainty facial features (often nose).

Rose: Curvilinear outer line, contoured inner line. Usually short to average height. Typically balanced to slightly bottom-heavy body. Some fullness to the features such as heavy-lidded large eyes and a slightly full to full mouth.

Kitten: Curvilinear outer line, contoured inner line. Usually short (not tall). Compact body with small, delicate bone structure. Usually large eyes with a rosebud mouth and small nose. Does not appear large or wide.

Doe: Curvilinear or curvy outer line, contoured inner line. Usually short (not tall). Compact, slightly wide bone structure with a combination or full/rounded and small facial features. Eyes are typically large and round. Usually small hands and feet. Does not appear sharp or large.

Cupid: Curvilinear or curvy outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually short to average height. Dainty bone structure, usually large and rounded eyes, full cheeks. Some dainty features that can be mistaken for sharp (e.g. the chin can appear sharpish when compared with fuller cheeks).

Languid: Linear or curvilinear outer line, angled or contoured inner line. Usually average height to tall. Elongated body, usually large eyes and slightly blunt features. Nose profile is often straight or convex. Face shape is typically elongated and narrow.
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The Style Memoirs has a Pinterest page with inspiration boards for all the types. Note: The boards were made to give an idea of the flair of each type. They are not examples of looks that only can be worn by that specific type or is all that the type (or everyone within said type) can wear.

A closer look at Languid

The past six posts on this blog has been about the subtypes of the main types, namely Dramatic, Natural, Classic, Gamine, Delicate and Romantic. As mentioned in each post, Languid is given a post of its own as it is a combination of Dramatic, Natural and Delicate. All the types are given one or more eras to represent the overall vibe of the type.; in the case of Languid the eras of inspiration are Empire/Regency, Pre-Raphaelite (art), Art Nouveau, 1910s.

 

Dr+N+De = Languid

 

Dramatic: Bold, streamlined, architectural, avant garde, exotic, regal. Cut-outs, shiny fabrics, metals, abstract prints, long line, tailored/structured. No frills attached!

Natural: Cool, efforlessly chic, relaxed fabrics, texture, artsy. Linen, wool, natural stones, inspiration from nature, leather, unstructured, width (not fragile), mixing and matching.

Delicate: Airy, etheral, intricate, lightweight feel, doll-like, dainty. Fragile and pliable fabrics, sheerness, dangly jewellery, shimmer and sparkle, flowy.

Languid: A combination of the aforementioned three types. The line is long and strong like the Dramatic, unstructured (except in the shoulders), the fabrics lightweight and flowy, texture, bold touches with a light touch, intricacy, motifs from nature, sheen, a magical elf-like feel.

A closer look at the Dramatic subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue).

In this post we will take a look at the Dramatic subtypes. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Dramatic who would be the art deco period, the 1980s and … the future.

 

Dramatic sub-categories

 

 

Amazon: Dramatic and Natural. What you get when you combine the effortlessly cool Natural with the striking Dramatic. The silhouette is strong, the details large and the vibe is part warrior, part trendsetter, part Studio 54. Era? 1970s, 1980s and modern day (plus ancient Egypt and Rome).

Urbane: Dramatic and Classic. The Urbane mixes the put-together, balanced Classic with the avant garde, regal Dramatic. The result is a sleek, modern and striking woman who looks great in patent leather stilettos and blazers, or a black sheath with an asymmetrical neckline highlighted with a wide white trim. Era? 1980s and modern day.

Experimental: Dramatic and Gamine. More expressionistic and wild than the Dramatic, bolder and more avant garde than the Gamine. The Experimental looks great in many looks, whether they are “out there” or not; as long as she plays with shapes, contrast and tailored or crisp fabrics. Era? 1960s, 1980s and modern day.

Minx: Dramatic and Delicate. The bird-like Delicate with her elf-like vibe is mixed with the salient and sharp Dramatic. Glitter and velvet, lace and leather, tailored and slinky fabrics, kitten heels and capes. Era? 1930s and early 1950s.

Serpentine: Dramatic and Romantic. A long silhouette is needed, likewise is soft fabrics and embellishments. She easily wears strong shoulders with surplice draping, large details and exotic florals, oriental prints on silk. Full and soft features is paired with strong bone structure or sharpness. Era? Art deco to 1940s and 1980s.

A closer look at the Natural subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue).

In this post we will take a look at the Natural subtypes. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Natural who would be the 1970s and modern day.

 

Natural sub-categories

 

Amazon: Natural and Dramatic. Warrior, goddess, fashion icon. The Amazon takes the roughness, the relaxed vibe and texture from the Natural and mixes it with the drama, strong silhouette and asymmetry of the Dramatic. Era? 1970s, 1980s and modern day (plus ancient Egypt and Rome).

Minimalist: Natural and Classic. Simple, chic, cool. The Natural with a trenchcoat and less dangly handcrafted jewellery, a Classic with jersey dresses and without her pearls. No froufrou, but instead elegant understatedness. Era? 1990s and modern day.

Pixie: Natural and Gamine. Quirky, mischievous, fun. Fitted and crisp cropped silhouettes from the Gamine melts together with the texture, mix-and-match feel and carefree vibe of the Natural. Era? Late 1960s, 1990s and modern day (perhaps in a different world).

Ingenue: Natural and Delicate. Pretty, fun, charming and friendly; the Ingenue is not neccessarily best suited to sharp avant garde. Instead the Ingenue combines the tactile feel and unrestricted look of the Natural with the intricate and sweet Delicate. Era? Art Nouveau and 1970s.

Wildflower: Natural and Romantic. Cool and friendly meets bombshell. Soft, tactile, curvy and artsy – the Wildflower looks great in embroidered knits and wool skirts and in jersey wrap dresses and cork wedges, but might want to steer clear of hard futuristic details and anything obviously synthetic.  Era? 1940s and 1970s.

A closer look at the Classic subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue).

In this post we will take a look at the Classic subtypes. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Classic who would be the 1950s and early to mid 1960s.

 

Classic sub-categories

 

Urbane: Classic and Dramatic. Elegant, modern, stylish and sleek. The put-together, balanced look of the Classic is given a more fashion forward flair where asymmetry is becoming, contrast adds drama and striking, bigger details replace the more moderate. Era? 1980s and modern day.

Minimalist: Classic and Natural. Take a Natural and remove some of the earthy textures, or take a Classic and tousle her hair and make her silhouette more relaxed. Scandinavian chic, simple, clean. Quality items with a grounded feel. No excessive bling, no detail overload. Era? 1990s and modern day.

Dapper: Classic and Gamine. The Classic travels back to the 1960s, joins a beatnik/mod crowd and returns to the present day. Playful, yet balanced and tailored. Unexpected details that harmonises with the outfit. Era? 1950s and 1960s.

Finespun: Classic and Delicate. The timeless look of the Classic is paired with the etheral quality of the Delicate. Intricate tucks, pleats, sheer fabrics and pearl embroidery add a softer touch to the tailored Classic. Where pearls and sparkle meet. Era? 1950s and 1960s.

Rose: Classic and Romantic. Feminine, elegant, lady-like, pretty. Silk blouses with a simple fabric bow, cotton pencil skirts, sheaths with perhaps a little flounce on the bottom. Pearls and filigree, blended colours, tailoring and subtle draping. Era? 1960s.

A closer look at the Gamine subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue).

In this post we will take a look at the Gamine subtypes. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Gamine who would be the 1960s.

 

Gamine sub-categories

 

 

Experimental: Gamine and Dramatic. Fun, fashion forward, avant garde, irregular, sporty and interesting. Big and small shapes are mixed, masculine with feminine, narrow with boxy, dark with light. Retro futurism. Era? 1960s, 1980s and modern day.

Pixie: Gamine and Natural. Woodland fairy, badass elf, sporty, pixie girl. More texture, relaxed fabrics and earthy materials than the traditional Gamine. Narrow silhouette combined with more relaxed lines, tactile fabrics, tribal prints, contrast, broken lines. Era? Late 1960s, 1990s and modern day (perhaps in a different world).

Dapper: Gamine and Classic. Mod or beatnik-like, a simpler, more timeless version of the Gamine. Broken lines, but not without repeating the colours and patterns elsewhere in the outfit. Narrow, fitted and tailored silhouette. Contrast piping and stripes, houndstooth and irregular polkadots. Era? 1950s and 1960s.

Kitten: Gamine and Delicate. Fitted, feminine and with a cute and/or fun edge. Vibrant use of colours, fitted fabrics with softness, small pleats and tucks, lace and glitter. Mini skirts and peplums, boat necks and dainty collars. Era? 1950s and 1990s.

Doe: Gamine and Romantic. Quirky, cute and feminine. Fitted silhouette with some softness and draping. Animated florals, visible colourful buttons, cloche hats, tulip skirts, Betsey Johnson and Charlotte Olympia accessories. Era? 1920s and 1930s (silent films).

A closer look at the Delicate subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue).

In this post we will take a look at the Delicate subtypes. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Delicate who would be the 1910s and 1930s.

 

Delicate sub-categories

 

Minx: Delicate and Dramatic. The fragility of the Delicate is given an edge. The impression is bolder. Theatrical glitz rather than airy and etheral. Scale is still dainty, but the styles are more showy. The silhouette is narrower and tighter. Era? 1930s and early 1950s.

Ingenue: Delicate and Natural. More texture and tactile fabrics, more casual feel, more earthy and approachable than elf-like. Youthful and sweet. Eyelet lace rather than chantilly lace.  Era? Art Nouveau and 1970s.

Finespun: Delicate and Classic. Elegant and a more mature vibe than the Delicate. More medium weight fabrics and narrower silhouettes. Less embellishment. Pearls and diamonds rather than colourful rhinestones. Era? 1950s and 1960s.

Kitten: Delicate and Gamine. Fitted and with a cute and/or fun edge. More vibrant use of colours, mixing prints and fabrics. Less floaty and airy. Mini skirts rather than knee-length (or longer). Era? 1950s and 1990s.

Cupid: Delicate and Romantic: More lush, fitted and curvy than the Delicate. Both Romantic and Delicate look their best in curvy shapes and the soft and ornate. The Romantic part of the Cupid brings tighter fabrics, more open necklines, slightly bigger prints and a more archetypically womanly feel. Era? 1930s, 1950s and 1990s.

A closer look at the Romantic subtypes

In a series of six posts we will take a closer look of each of the subtypes of a main type to get a better idea of how they compare against each other. Each of the subtypes combines two main types to create a new type, with the expection of the Languid which will get a post of their own due to being a mix of three (Dramatic, Natural and Ingenue). The first we will take a look at is the subtypes of the Romantic. For fun, each type is given a, era to give an idea of the differences in vibe; starting off with Romantic who would be the late 1940s (New Look) and 1950s.

 

Romantic sub-categories

 

Serpentine: Romantic and Dramatic. The lines are sleeker, more angular and longer – an elongated silhouette is required. Ornateness and softness are important for the Serpentine just as it is for the Romantic, but here the scale is bigger and the designs can be bolder. The Dramatic truly brings the drama. Era? Art deco to 1940s and 1980s.

Wildflower: Romantic and Natural. The softness and femine ornateness remains, but the Wildflower should avoid anything fussy or over the top. A more artisan touch is introduced, as is more texture and more earthy fabrics such as linen and suede. Era? 1940s and 1970s.

Rose: Romantic and Classic. Feminine and elegant, quite a bit more pared down than the Romantic. The full vintage dresses are swapped for sleeker sheaths, yet the softness and bling is maintained. Era? 1960s.

Doe: Romantic and Gamine. The Doe has a more girly, funky look, where the details are quirkier and smaller. Big roses are swapped for peonies and lilies of the valley, and the silhouette is more perky and cropped. Era? 1920s and 1930s (silent films).

Cupid: Romantic and Delicate: Smaller, sharper and more intricate than the Romantic. Both Romantic and Delicate look their best in curvy shapes and the soft and ornate, and here daintier details, less tailoring or all-over fitted garments (i.e. more looseness), and a more sparkly, airy feel is introduced. Era? 1930s, 1950s and 1990s.